Light Night Leeds 2012

October 12, 2012

We made the short hop across into Yorkshire for the Leeds Light Night last week. An evening of activities, exhibitions, installations, films and general liveliness which took place well into the dark of night across the city. The map of events was full of things to see and do, far too many for us to get around them all, so we planned some activities and stumbled across others while en route.

I was keen to visit Leeds City Art Gallery‘s ‘Drawing Sculpture‘ exhibition, which displayed work which presented a link between the act of drawing and creating sculpture. It was an interesting exhibition, supported well by the accompanying essay by Anna Lovatt in the exhibition catalogue. However, before we even stepped foot into the grand gallery building we came across a group of Indian musicians and dancers playing outside the entrance, drawing a crowd of visitors keen to have a go. At one point, when there must have been at least 100 people dancing, it felt as if we had stepped into a peculiar new type of exercise class with everyone following the moves of the main dancers.

After an autumnal soup break in the decadent tiled cafe, we put our names down for some light painting with artist David Shearing. We timed it perfectly as it was particularly popular and they had to stop admitting visitors shortly after our turn. Armed with a plethora of glowing toys we created some light drawings via projection and computer software, which mimicked the action of light painting on a camera with the shutter left open for a few seconds. Our effort wasn’t the most artistically thought out, but it was fun nonetheless!

We exited through the inflatable dome, squeezing out of the tunnel like Ace Ventura out of the Rhino’s backside. Fun, yes. Flattering, no. There was no time for embarrassment however, as we ran (responsibly) through the gallery to the showing of ‘Turning at Right Angles to Midnight’ by Andi Noble and Matt Collins. It was a beautiful glimmering delight of sound and lights.

Other highlights of the evening were the video and animation projections strewn across the walls all over the Leeds College of Art building, showcasing some exquisite talent from the young artists. Ending the evening we came across some ladies dressed in some strange attire, looking rather like beautiful zombies who were on their way home. We stopped to ask what they had been doing that evening and they told us that they were singing as they are an a cappella quartet and offered to sing us a song! They did so, and by the end of it we found that a crowd had joined us in bopping about to their smooth, smooth sound. The perfect goodbye and end to the evening.

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Falling Triangles

March 2, 2012

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I recently exhibited my Light Paintings and a Light Sculpture at the ‘Threads’ exhibition with Roger Bygott and Hannah Leighton-Boyce at the Link Gallery.

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I used electrical tape to frame my Light Painting projections, this was necessary to create a defined area for these works as they work with light and shade, so the shaded parts would have been lost without the frame.

I made my sculpture in response to the unusual shape of the gallery. I used white thread to reshape the space in a mix of sharp angular shapes, some covered with paper as platforms for the bright slowly moving projections to bring the sculpture to life. The light from the projections catches on the strings, illuminating them and giving a sense of movement. The shadows cast from the sculpture also moves across the back wall as the light and dark areas of the projection slowly shift across the space.

Here is an extract from the installation view of my Light Sculpture:

Light Painting

January 13, 2012

Light painting

Here’s a still from the light paintings I’ve been working on recently. The results are to be viewed in film format as I manipulate light to create colours, shape and movement. This form of ‘painting’ is influenced by Brian Eno’s ‘Video Paintings‘, where he filmed images and presented them as slow moving paintings to be watched vertically as well as horizontally so as to detract from the typical TV viewing experience and expectations, and to be viewed as an art piece.

You can watch one of my monochrome Light Paintings here: